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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 230 (some duplicates have been removed)
in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate economies by means o
of protest. >> the german parliament approves billions in loans and guarantees to save greece from bankruptcy. >> with more and more shoppers seeking out handcrafted and traditional gifts, germany's famous christmas markets struggled to keep up with the demand. tens of thousands of egyptians are out protesting against president morsi at this hour after an islamist-led assembly raced through the approval of a new constitution, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assem
in europe -- but greece -- puts greece as the most corrupt country in europe. >> germany is mulling over whether to try to outlaw a far- right party accused of stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment. minister >> to go formal step toward banning the national democratic party, -- ministers took a formal step toward banning the national democratic party, the npd. some worry that prohibiting the party could backfire. it could drum up sympathy for the far right. >> the ministers are united in their call for a ban on meat npd. they reviewed extensive -- on the npd. they reviewed extensive documentation before making up their mind. >> i never would have thought they were so anti-democratic or anti-semitic. or so oriented towards violence and so unconstitutional. we have been discussing a ban for 12 years. now we have a lot of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party
, should be vigorously pursued and the culprits punished. greece, meanwhile, is still struggling to get back on its feet financially. the country would desperately like to have more tax revenues, but it is not enough to just raise taxes for private households. companies would also need to pay their fair share, and there are greek companies which are still doing well despite the financial crisis. but not all are willing to foot the bill for others. that is why some companies are relocating to switzerland, for instance. >> 66-year-old george moved to switzerland 20 years ago to set up a software company in geneva. he made over 200 million euros. now, many of his fellow greeks are looking to follow in his footsteps, and he can see why -- not only does he love the beautiful swiss countryside and the country's efficiency, he also appreciates its low rate of taxation. >> it is not illegal, but morally unacceptable that in some comfort -- countries, you have to pay 50% tax. anybody who wants to have a good quality life -- i find it proper no more. it has to do with tax. >> tax regulation is es
stories of the year. and, why china set up shop in greece at the height of the euro crisis. but first, this "in the know" message. the euro crisis continued to remain a major concern for investors throughout the course of 2012. at the center of it all, greece. the country grappled with a need for bailouts with strings attached in the form of severe budget cuts that sparked protests from the people. however, the financial crisis in europe is providing an opportunity for china. earlier this year, we heard from new york times reporter liz alderman on a chinese shipping company that is making waves in greece. > > how successful has this shipping company, known as cosco, been so far in greece? > > it's an interesting story. this chinese basically state- run shipping company came in here about three years ago in a $500 million deal that ever since then has been a model for the country, because what they did is they bought half of piraeus port, which is an ancient port in greece and one of the most important ports in the southern mediterranean. what they did was they basically took an operat
the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
with a daring new plan to save greece. >> welcome back. greece has announced a plan to buy back bonds as part of its effort to reduce its debt load. >> the success of the plan is essential to unlocking the next payment of eight athens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work -- of aid to a thens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work. >> german finance minister wolfgang schaeuble and his french counterpart, pierre moscovici, went in front of parliament. >> things have to move fast. there is no reason to worry. the calculations are realistic. i hope it works. >> there is no plan b. >> the finance ministers brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on
for greece's rural population. >> but first, here are some other stories making headlines. thousands of sunni muslims are continuing their protests against the iraqi government, demanding the resignation of the prime minister, accusing him of sectarian politics. that's after bodyguards of the sunni finance minister were arrested on terrorism charges last week. >> the president of the central african republic has appealed to france and the u.s. for help against a rebel coalition that has vowed to topple his government. france has declined to intervene against the rebels who have already taken several towns and are now advancing on the capital. >> heavy snow has paralyzed large parts of eastern canada. in montreal, traffic came to a virtual standstill. police are telling people to stay at home, as some areas are expected to receive almost half a year of additional snow. well, we are going to a short break. after we come back, we will look at europe's crisis year 2012. >> we will find out how it will be a year to forget for one of germany's top swimmers. stay with us. >> welcome back. in just th
unchanged at 4,583. we'll see where trading takes us throughout the rest of the day. greece is buying back bonds. it exceeds the 30 billion euro target. greece had been seeking investors willing to accept at 30 to 40% of the bond's face value. the program is designed to reduce the debt burden. analysts estimate greece will be able to shave about 20 billion euro's off its debt. this will clear the way for greece to receive a new infusion ofore th bilon eos in aid from the eu and other principal lenders. the organization of petroleum export and countries held a general meeting in vienna yesterday. representatives of the 12 oil exporters agreed to retain the current production target of 30 million barrels a day. they say supply is sufficient and prices are appropriate for the moment. prices in new york of benchmark crude futures have been relatively stable since the summer at just around $85 a barrel. this is against a background of slower economic recovery. opec expects demand for crude to rise as the dploe ball economy picks up. some analysts say opec could consider cutting output. heres a
? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if republicans don't change the way they do business they may be on the losing end of elections for years to come. plus, the black helicopter crowd is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives us a rich man's look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> never too early for pollsters to start head to 2016. guess who's looking very strong? hillary clinton. a new abc news/washington post
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
. before the upgrade, greece's rating had fallen to selective default, which meant it failed to pay on one or more of its obligations. now it was pushed upward to b minus. this shows that greece can meet its financial commitments. i spoke to the fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. >> i think was s&p is catching up to is the improved political goodwill in the rest of the euro area towards the greek economy. yesterday, greece got 34 billion euros as a quid pro quo for having implemented a long list of reforms and fiscal austerity. s&p as saying, we expect this money to continue to flow from up euro area. nd we expect thre greek government to continue to implement economic reforms in the future. >> does this upgrade change anything for grece in rea ?ce ter >> the greek exit from the euro area is an extremely unlikely event, precisely for the reason s&p outlined -- that the euro area has politically decided to keep greece in the euro area. this is not something that will make a big difference in the short term, but because it does not reflect a change in the domestic
international says greece's handling of illegal migrants make it and i were the member of the european union. a senior official at the ministry told the bbc every year around 130,000 people are arrested when they enter the country illegally. we have more in this report. >> greece is a major gateway for migrants from asian and african countries trying to enter the european union. that they are discriminated against is not new but what this report is saying is that the mistreatment they are suffering now is reaching crisis levels. thousands are detained in an appalling conditions or left vulnerable in the streets where racist attacks happened on it almost daily basis. greece is at the front line of the migration challenge. more than 80% of migrants into into the european union and they do go through greece. thousands end up in detention camps and many of those who are not detained spent days and nights waiting to apply for asylum. other recent months, there has been a wave of attacks on immigrants, a number of them being stabbed to death. it is not just the illegal migrants or asylum seekers f
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
in recent history? and if things are so bad why haven't the british like say the people of greece or spain taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest
, the you chose not to abandon them, but greece continues to have to make drastic cuts, leaving marks that are visible throughout the country, including a long one of the world's most famous routes -- along one of the world's most famous routes. ♪ >> at precisely 42,195 meters long, this is the route that has become the standard for all marathon runners. the course was inspired by a 2500-year old myth, only today it is run on asphalt along with the capital's main roads. this is the bay where it said the lenda battle took place in 490 bc. it marked the first greek victory over the persians. according to legend, the athenian warriors gathered in a phalanx formation and managed to fight off a persian invasion. then a messenger ran the 42- kilometer distance to athens with news of the victory. at the local museum, the marathon's legacy is omnipresent. more modern-day hellenistic heroes have also been demoralize here. for instance, marathon runner who won the first olympic marathon in 1896. >> exactly like the car which they gave to the winner. >> at the eight-kilometer mark, there are r
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
are your percentage chances that the u.s. will eventually end up like greece? >> well, look, if i could just answer that, i'm an optimist on america. i believe in america. i'd buy it, you know, if america was a publicly-traded company, i'd buy the stock every day. this country and this economy is tremendously resilient. and one of the great things, i think, about our book is it's got ideas that require action in washington, it's also at state level, individual level and there's some business and corporate level. so, you know, what are the odds? i would, you know, i'm an on the optimist. i would say we will get back to growth. >> kevin? >> the oecd, which is an organization that studies large, developed nations just did a big study to try to identify how big the policy challenges facing the nations around the world are. and they estimated something called the fiscal adjustment, and the fiscal adjustment for greece that they need -- which is either the immediate tax increase or the immediate reduction in spending necessary to make it so that their economy doesn't just explode is about 3%
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
that a crucial vote on egypt's constitution could be delayed. we've got the latest. greece's debt crisis turns its hospitals into virtual ses pools. how it is spawning health disaster that could reach far beyond its borders. piles of money coming up. ♪ . melissa: now onto the middle east. the pressure not letting up for egyptian predent mohammed morsi. reports say he is ready to postpone the scheduled vote on the new constitution which would cement his sweeping powers. earlier today protesters broke through the barriers around the presidential palace. police fired tear gas at a crowd of almost 1000 people out seed cairo tv studios. we have a fox news contributor, specializing in middleeast counterterrorism affairs. lisa, it looks like things are getting more out of control all the time. people keep saying ts is going to calm down. what is your, what is your take on it? >> well, as long as moi's factions, the muslim brotherhood will remain steadfast in a power grab d maintaining their agenda, the people, opposition saying this is not what we fought for the company will remain in perpetual rev
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
. >> thanks for joining us. another moment of truth for athens -- when greece finds out weather its author -- offer to repurchase debt from private investors has paid off. that will help trigger the release of more rescue funds that greece so desperately needs to stay afloat. >> athens has offered to pay 10 billion euros to holders of its sovereign debt at a buyback value of up to 40 cents per euro. to be successful, the sale has to cut a greek national debt by 20 billion euros. news from athens made investors nervous this friday. our correspondence sent us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the suspense on the stock trading floor that weather or not the creditors of greece would take part in the debt buyback was too much for many investors. they decided to take some of the book's profits and sell shares. shares of deutsche telekom were the biggest dax losers. in order to invest money into new technologies such as broadband networks, they decided to cut the dividend for investors. now, many people here fear that this is something that more companies might do also next year,
of the u.s. government it would make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. but some things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
fleeing are going to greece. >> the emigrants' washing ashore are now struggling with their first european winter. they are from somalia, afghanistan, increasingly syrian. all on a camp that is run by volunteers to provide food and shelter. he has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brother in athens. >> our live was assured in syria. we cannot stay in syria. there were bombs attacking the houses. we cannot stay in syria. >> this is where many people cross over to the greek island from turkey. it is seen in the distance behind me. it is not far away, but the journey is dangerous. the boats used are often in battered conditions and at this time of year, the seas can be very rough. not everyone makes it across. more than 20 drowned from this group and here is the only survivor who was finished half dead out of the sea by the greek coastguard. they're now trying to call friends and family to tell them he is alive. he is receiving counseling, but he seems very confused about what to do next. meanwhile, more and more syrians are arriving in athens who know no one in this city
? >> greece is a perfect example when you continue to borrow from the future, which is what we're doing right now. so if you don't deal with entitlement reform now, if you don't say to people under 50, things are going to be different, what happens is you get to the point where you're in greece and you tell an 85-year-old, you used to get $150 euros a month and now you're not. chris: the medicine is the cure. >> the comparisons between the united states and greece which republicans like to make are so wildly -- chris: what is the apt comparison if this country doesn't get its act together? >> the united states really is unique. we are still the world's store -- chris: can we bank on the fact that we're the currency of the world and we can keep running enormous deficits? >> we have the ability to issue debt in our own currency and make it credibility. nobody else can do that and people keep buying it. two more quick points, chris, about this what we are seeing now. first, the president has taken leadership of his own party, something he really didn't do during his first term and right out of t
of the u.s. government it uld make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. butome things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 230 (some duplicates have been removed)

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